Thứ Hai, 29 tháng 12, 2014

When your co-worker earns more than you - HRM

When your co-worker earns more than you

It can come as quite a surprise if you happen to learn that a co-worker whom you thought you held the same rank as is actually earning more than you.

Though a debate is growing around whether companies should make pay information transparent, the status quo is currently to keep individual pay a private matter between the employee and HR. This is why it can come as quite a surprise if you happen to learn that a co-worker whom you thought you held the same rank as is actually earning more than you.

So what are your options besides feeling inadequately compensated? Several HR and pay experts weigh in on how to change your compensation, improve your career path and the steps you should avoid taking.



Don’t turn to your co-workers for information

If your first instinct is to ask your co-worker what qualifies him to earn more, or to ask other co-workers how your pay is determined, stop right there. Deb LaMere, vice president of HR strategy and employee engagement at human capital management services and technology firm Ceridian, says, “Speaking with co-workers about their pay level in relation to your own often results in negative consequences. This type of conversation can lead to resentment and anger, effectively changing relationships for [the] worse between co-workers, project teams and possibly with direct management.”

While transparent pay information would resolve the secrecy issue that can trigger problems at work, it holds true that compensation levels can vary widely for valid reasons. “There are many factors to consider when it comes to evaluating individual pay, especially length and type of experience,” LaMere adds. “Having a salary comparison conversation with a co-worker is not constructive to understanding ones' own pay rate and possibly influencing changes to individual pay and compensation levels.”

Research compensation trends and standards

Instead of turning to your co-workers for information, rely on outside sources and garner as many points of data as possible. “Lots of information is readily available through salary surveys and websites, industry associations, recruiters/headhunters who place candidates in your industry and space and through actively networking with colleagues and developing real meaningful professional relationships… so that delicate topics like salary, bonus and benefits will be discussed openly and shared comfortably,” says Roy Cohen, career coach and author of “The Wall Street Professional's Survival's Guide.” “You also need to be absolutely clear on what the numbers represent. Are they for equivalent positions and for equivalent performance?”

Prove your worth

Once you have a well-researched idea of the pay level you could and should be on, gather evidence for your boss that echoes those numbers. “One option is to volunteer for and take on visible, challenging initiatives and then manage them successfully,” Cohen says. “That is just half the battle and it is often where the process breaks down. While a project is underway and once it is completed, key stakeholders must be made aware of your significant contributions both during and after...The gift that keeps on giving. It is helpful to have a mentor within the company who can advocate for you and enhance your visibility as well as serve as a sounding board for advice on how to approach your boss.”

Whether you have office backup or you’re presenting on behalf of yourself, it’s important to prove to your boss that a pay raise is deserved because of your merits, not that you’ve simply learned of the pay discrepancy.

Take it to your boss

You’ve done the research and ensured that your request will be backed up by proof of your hard work. So how do you begin this conversation with your boss? Katie Donovan, a salary and career negotiation consultant, equal pay advocate and founder of Equal Pay Negotiations LLC, says, “Start the process of discussing a raise or salary adjustment with your direct manager. I recommend asking for help, not demanding a raise. Say something like, ‘I recently discovered that I am paid below the market value for this job. What can we do to rectify it?’ This makes it a collaborate discussion and gives management the opportunity to come up with a solution, which might be better than you anticipated.”

Heading into the meeting, “bring with you the research you did on pay for the job so you can discuss your research,” Donovan says. “Also, be prepared to highlight your contributions to the company as reasons you deserve to be paid on the high end of the pay range for the job. If you can, compare it to the lesser results of co-workers. Very effective reasons are contributions that saved the company money or generated revenue for the company. Do not expect a solution in this first meeting but do ask for a response in a certain time so this does not drag on forever. Something like ‘Can you get back to me by Friday on this?’”

Negotiating pay is a tough part of advancing in your career, but receiving the compensation that you deserve is well worth the time.

(Picture Source: Internet)
HRVietnam - Collected

Why more women should have mentors

Many successful women cite having had a mentor as the biggest influence in their career.

Sheryl Sandberg and Meg Whitman had mentors. So did Tina Fey. Why don’t you?

Many successful women cite having had a mentor as the biggest influence in their career. So, if we all know it’s important, then why don’t more of us have them and how do we get one?

Where the mentor gap begins

According to the Harvard Business Review, one of the biggest problems for women seems to be that we don’t seek out mentors the way men do, and when we do, those mentors are usually in a less senior position than the mentors men choose.

The other factor is time. As women, we typically have the added burden of doing the majority of the work-life balancing. As a result, women who obtain powerful positions in their careers and have families often have less time to offer formal mentoring to others, even if they have benefited from it themselves.

Women are projected to make up 51 percent of the workforce by 2018. To ensure that we grow to our full potential, finding a mentor needs to become a priority.

While bluntly asking someone to be your mentor can be effective, mentorship usually happens when your good work gets the attention of your boss or someone in a higher position sees you as a younger version of themselves, inspiring her to take you under her wing.

When you’re in the spotlight for a job well done, take a moment to speak to your supervisor, the CEO or someone else you feel will be able to best guide you. Discuss your work, where you see yourself going and ask for advice on how to get there. You can ask for monthly touch-base meetings or whatever your soon-to-be-mentor’s schedule will allow.

In essence, you’re asking without asking, and hopefully the relationship grows and evolves organically.



The rules of finding a mentor
We all have friends whose career trajectories we admire and simultaneously think to ourselves, how did they get to where they are? Naturally a lot of hard work was involved but if you actually dig, you may find that one or more mentors were involved along the way. In my life, that friend is Kristen Ferraro. I’ve watched her career progress from administrative roles to her current position asGlobal Manager, Customer Engagement and CRM Strategy for Cigna.When I told her about this article, she was more than happy to share how mentors positively impacted her professional development and helped her take her career to the next level.

1. Start early
At the onset of our careers, we’re still learning the ropes and aren’t as confident. It’s hard not to take things personally when interactions at the office are less-than-friendly. Ferraro was fortunate to find a mentor early in her professional career to teach her these lessons and serve as a touchstone whenever needed. Her second office job was at Edge Trade (eventually acquired by Knight Capital Group), and then-CFO Norman Schwartz saw that Ferraro sometimes struggled with the more difficult personalities in the office. He took her aside and gave her the best professional advice anyone has ever given her: “Don’t take things personally.” What this advice did was help her take a step back and see the bigger picture and to figure out what she could and couldn’t control. “You’re not here to make friends,” he said. “You’re here to do a job. Stay focused on the work and the goals of the company.”

2. Have support outside of the workplace
Ferraro’s father, Ralph, is an educator and always encouraged her to face any challenge head on. Whenever she’d complain about work-related issues, he’d push her to address them and advise that working to overcome the issues would make her a better professional and a better person. Ralph is living proof that there is no challenge you should back down from. When faced with the devastating news that he had cancer and was given six months to live, he fought for his life. Today Ralph stands as a medical miracle, cancer free, and a constant inspiration to his daughter to tackle any challenge, no matter how big.

3. You never outgrow mentorships
The need for a mentor later in your career is just as critical as having one at the start. As competition for higher-level positions becomes fiercer, having someone that can help catapult your career to the next level is imperative. Once again, Ferraro found that person when applying for her current job. Ferraro and her interviewer Michele Paige instantly hit it off during the interview process, and she was offered the job. From day one, Paige shared her desire to help Ferraro develop. She advised her to take a skills assessment test so they could identify areas of strength and align them with her work and projects. Then they’d identify areas for improvement and work on developing them.

Mentoring takes time and dedication, but it is a valued relationship for both parties involved and can offer just as much to the mentor as it does the mentee: A fresh perspective on the work at hand, the opportunity to keep your skills sharp and a personal sense of reward from seeing the positive effects your actions have had on someone else. Indeed, Ferraro herself is currently mentoring interns within her organization and states, “It’s a great way to remind myself of the valuable lessons I've learned along my own journey."

(Picture Source: Internet)
HRVietnam - Collected

Thứ Hai, 8 tháng 9, 2014

Top 10 Ways to Find Your Career Path - Human Capital

Top 10 Ways to Find Your Career Path

If you're not sure which direction your career should go in, you're thinking about making a career change, or you just want to feel more fulfilled in your career, these ten tips might help.

Ideally, everyone would know their true calling early in life and find happiness in their work, but it often doesn't work that way. One survey (of New York professionals) found that they expected to change careers three times in their lifetimes; lifelong careers may not be the norm any more.

That said, we know there are better ways to choose a career than just following your parents' footsteps or choosing randomly. Here are some ideas.

10. Think About What Excites and Energizes You



This one's the first obvious step—we all want to enjoy and actually like our careers. (Perhaps the biggest sign you're on the wrong path is if you dread talking about your job.) While passion isn't the only requirement for being content in your career, many would say it's still essential, if only because passion is what keeps you going even through the tough times. Is there a job you would do job for free?

9. But Also Keep in Mind What You're Good At



Maybe you don't feel that passionate about any specific career—or you love multiple areas and can't decide on just one. Then it's time to think about your personality and focus on the skills you have. "Don't do what you love. Do what you are."

8. Take a Test



Well, you say, what if you don't know what you're good at or even what you're interested in? Career assessment tests in college or even high school help narrow down a field (perhaps with the Myers-Briggs personality index), but if it's been a while since you took those tests, there are other kinds of assessment tests you can take. This one from Rasmussen College matches your self-reported skills and interests with potential jobs. (And they also have a salary and job growth interactive chart.) For potential programmers, Switch recommends a coding career based on your preferences. About.Com's Job Search site has a collection of other career tests.

You can also find a career that fits your motivational focus with this assessment test.

7. Try an Internship



If you have flexibility when it comes to salary, an internship could be a great way to test out an industry or type of career—and eventually get a full-time job (especially if you have no prior experience). Even if it doesn't turn into a job or you find out it's the wrong career for you, an internship can help build your network—from which you can get career and job advice. (Not all internships are just about picking up coffee. For example, Google internships, while hard to come by, put you to real work.)

6. Find a Mentor



A mentor could help you take your career to the next level and give you the insider insight to help you make sure you're on the right path. Here's how to ask someone to be your mentor.

If there's a career you're interested in, you might also check to see if any companies or people in that line of work would let you shadow them for a few days to see what it's really like.

5. Explore Unconventional Careers



We all know the popular careers available to us—doctor, lawyer, teacher, computer engineer, police officer, store owner, etc. If you feel uninspired by the typical choices, know that there are thousands of unusual jobs you might not have heard about, hidden, perhaps, in the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Handbook. Mashable has a list of six dream jobs that pay well (panda caretaker! Chocolate inspector!), Thought Catalog highlights 10 more (sex toy testers?!), and Chron lists a couple of others (along with related articles like "Unusual careers with animals" and "unusual accounting careers").

4. Ask Other People



Perhaps the best way to discover a new career is to ask other people about theirs—assuming you come into contact with people who don't all work in the same field. Your LinkedIn network (or other social media sites, but especially LinkedIn) might be a good place to start mining for information. Also, don't forget your local library's reference librarian can point you to career resources.

3. Use the G+P+V Formula



The perfect career for you would most likely fit the G+P+V formula, which stands for Gifts + Passions + Values. Consider your strengths and passions, as we've noted above, and your values—what's nonnegotiable about the way you work?

2. Make a Career Plan



As with most things, your career will benefit if you have goals and a plan for it. Maybe you think you want to be a writer, but the next step after that, is editing. (Do you really want to do that?) Or maybe you want to transition from being an editor to a restaurant owner. (How are you going to get there?) Map out where you want to go, with concrete milestones, as if it were a four-phase project.

1. See Your Career as a Set of Stepping Stones, Not a Linear Path



Of course, all these plans and ideas are never set in stone. Your career is a marathon, not a sprint and it can turn out to be a very winding road indeed, knitted together from all of your experiences into, hopefully, a career worth having.

Photos from VoodooDot (Shutterstock), OpenClips (Pixabay), Mopic (Shutterstock), sacks08, auremar (Shutterstock), Little Birth, bobsfever.

Lifehacker.Com

QUIZ: Are you enthusiastic, or are you a kiss-up?

Some people are naturally more energetic, positive and enthusiastic than others, and then there are the people who channel those emotions and actions into advantageous relationships, also known as kiss-ups.

Do you use a lot of exclamation marks when you send an email?! Is the status report of every project you’re working on “Great!”? Do you have a handshake that could give whiplash to someone’s wrist if you’re not careful?

Some people are naturally more energetic, positive and enthusiastic than others, and then there are the people who channel those emotions and actions into advantageous relationships, also known as kiss-ups. While it’s fine to be a hard worker and bring your enthusiasm to the role, you risk your reputation and relationships with co-workers if your behavior more closely resembles manipulation, and nobody wins in that scenario. Avoid the drama and take this quiz to find out if you’re simply enthusiastic or acting like a kiss-up.



1. Have you ever brought in coffee or snacks for your boss?

A. Yes, but they were also for the department to enjoy.
B. No, that’s not part of my job.
C. Yes, every Monday morning I bring her favorite coffee and muffin from the café across town.

2. How often do you volunteer for the projects nobody wants?

A. I’ve stepped up and taken projects that weren’t my favorite -- but it felt good to get the work done.
B. Never…other people usually end up taking them and I’m fine with that.
C. As often as I can! I know my boss will notice and reward my efforts.

3. Who do you usually talk to at the office holiday party?

A. My co-workers, the boss, my co-workers’ guests, the cleaning staff, the caterers…
B. The same people I talk to at work and maybe their guests.
C. My boss and her husband, her boss, human resources and any other important power players.

4. Do you ever stay late or work weekends if there’s a bigger workload?

A. Sure! If the work can’t get done on normal hours, I don’t mind taking the extra time to do it right.
B. I’ve had to, but I wouldn’t volunteer my time if I could get the deadline moved to accommodate the workload.
C. One time I didn’t while my boss was on vacation, but most of the time I’m the first to volunteer to stay late.

5. Your boss made a major financial mistake and the department is in serious trouble. What do you do?

A. If the mistake can be fixed, I’ll try to help. Otherwise, there’s not much I can do.
B. Nothing -- it wasn’t my fault, right?
C. I confidentially tell my boss that I can take the blame for this mistake if it means I’ll be rewarded for my loyalty later.

Mostly A’s: You’re enthusiastic. The energy you bring to your job is contagious, and your co-workers are likely glad to have you around. From helping with unsavory projects to being social at company parties, you’re a strong member of the team and when you’re not around, people miss your presence. There’s never a quiet brainstorm session when you’re in attendance, and waiting at the microwave in the break room isn’t too awkward, thanks to your steady stream of conversation. All in all, your enthusiasm is a valuable asset to your career. Just make sure your emails aren’t solely punctuated by exclamation marks.

Mostly B’s: You’re a killjoy. You don’t need to have a smile on your face every day to do a good job at work, but your morose attitude isn’t doing you any favors. It doesn’t seem like you’re networking within your company or outside of it, and your refusal to lend an extra helping hand is likely preventing you from establishing new relationships or earning the trust of your co-workers. Remember that extra work and achievements are the way to move forward in your career, and the attitude that you have during those accomplishments is what sets you apart -- for better or for worse.

Mostly C’s: You’re a kiss-up. It’s great that you’re so eager to help a team member or be there to support your boss, but it’s clear that you’re out for the approval of upper management instead of letting your achievements speak for themselves. In fact, what achievements do you have? If you’re more memorable for always standing in the boss’s shadow than for the successful project you headed last quarter, it’s time to rethink your priorities and establish a game plan that puts you and your hard work front and center.

(Picture Source: Internet)
HRVietnam - Collected

Thứ Năm, 23 tháng 1, 2014

What Does an Employee Relations Manager Do?

The duties of an employee relations manager often vary, depending on the needs of the company. These managers usually have the responsibility of handling issues that may develop between the general work force and management. In addition, they often work in human resources, and may handle employment interviews, work evaluations and in some cases be responsible for employee termination.

In some instances, an employee relations manager may have the responsibility of working with various union representatives. This could include bargaining, contract negotiations, and determining the validity of union grievances. Labor unions are organizations formed by workers within a specific work group to help protect workers from unfair labor practices and to help ensure they are receiving the highest possible wages and benefits.

Most countries and regions have laws designed to protect workers and to ensure that practices of hiring and firing are not prejudicial. In many cases, an employee relations manager oversees employment and termination to make sure these laws are upheld. In addition, they will often help laid off or terminated employees gain access to unemployment benefits or new jobs. This is especially important when the terminated employees start looking for new employment. Most of the time, it will be the employee relations manager who will be responsible for verifying their references.

In some companies, people who work in employee relations also have the responsibility of handling health care benefits. This is especially true with smaller businesses that are not large enough to warrant their own health insurance divisions. In these companies, an employee relations manager would likely help with employee insurance claims, and may sometimes act as an arbitrator involving problems that may arise involving health care coverage.

Salary expectations for an employee relations manager vary a great deal depending on experience, education, and the company. In the United States, the average salary for this position is around $88,000 US Dollars (USD). The highest percentile averages are around $116,000 USD, and the lowest salary averages are around $65,000 USD. Most companies consider an employee relations manager as a member of their human resource team.

People interested in a career as an employee relations manager should probably seek a degree in business or administrative services. Course work in psychology or social services may also be beneficial in obtaining work within this field. In addition, having a working knowledge of labor laws and their application may also be helpful.

Wisegeek.Com/what-does-an-employee-relations-manager-do.Htm

Thứ Tư, 22 tháng 1, 2014

What Is Human Resource Economics?

Human resource economics is a term that is used to describe the collective strategies and approaches that seek to address the utilization of labor within the workforce and how that utilization has an impact on the greater economic well-being of a nation or other locality. Typically, this type of economics considers the impact of employee turnover, unemployment, and even the role of labor unions and governmental policies on the efficient utilization of human resources. The general idea of human resource economics is to understand factors that interact to help grow and sustain the use of labor within the workplace to the mutual benefit of the employer and the employee, while also measuring the impact of that relationship on the economy in general.

Using human resource economics in terms of function within a company usually involves attempting to match the skills sets required for a particular job position with the abilities of a specific employee. This process calls for evaluating the talents of the employee, relating them to the work available and determining if both the employer and the employee will benefit from the placement. In the best possible scenario, the employee is happy and looks forward to coming to work, taking pleasure in what is accomplished during the workday. At the same time, the employer is satisfied with the productivity of the employee and there is no need to spend time, money, and effort attempting to replace that employee.

On a larger scale, human resource economics will often focus on assessing employment issues that impact the greater economy. This can mean addressing issues of unemployment in one or more industries, and how those figures impact consumer spending and general stimulation of the economy. Attention to the impact of employment laws, whether positive or negative, is also part of this process. Even the role of unions in protecting the rights of employees and how those regulations impact the ability of employers to sustain a business operation over the long term  human resource share  are considered as part of the economic aspects of human resources strategies and initiatives.

The scope of human resource economics seeks to understand and manage the effective usage of labor so that all parties involved benefit. This means job placement that meets the needs of both employee and employer, while also providing opportunities for growth that benefits both parties in the future. From there, the impact of those efforts on the stability of the economy are taken into consideration, which in turn helps to enact legislation that amends current labor practices or possibly paves the way for implementation of new practices that ultimately benefit everyone involved with that economy.

Wisegeek.Com/what-is-human-resource-economics.Htm

Chủ Nhật, 19 tháng 1, 2014

Change Your Employees’ View of Change

The general thinking is that people don’t like change. In reality, humans are born loving change. Think about it … babies cry until you change them. Also, why do we take vacations? Because we want a change. We need to get out of our usual surroundings and see something new. In this case, change is a choice, and we like it.

But there is also a negative side to change, and that is when the change affects you personally and you didn’t see it coming. However, most of those changes that come “out of nowhere” are actually very visible months or even years before the change hits. When do people get burglar alarms? After being robbed! We all tend to react to change and put out fires more than we anticipate what will happen based on the direction change is heading.

It’s time to become more anticipatory in terms of change so you can see it coming. Only then can you use change as an opportunity for growth rather than a crisis to be managed.

How to Be Anticipatory

There are two types of change that you can use to see the future accurately. First is cyclical change. You’re in the midst of cyclical change every day: weather cycles, biological cycles, business cycles … these are all examples of cyclical change. In the United States, you know exactly when the next presidential election will be, when the next full moon will be, plus many other key things that cycle with time. You know that if the stock market goes up, it will eventually go down. Cycles are everywhere; you just have to be aware of them.

The second is linear change. Once this type of change hits, you’re never going back to the old way. For example, once you get a smart phone you’re never going back to a dumb phone. Once the people in China park their bicycle and get a car, they will not go back to the bicycle as their primary form of transportation. It’s one-way change with many predictable consequences.

When you look around and determine what cycles you experience in your business, as well as what linear changes have been happening and then look out from there, you can turn the predictable changes into an advantage. That’s how you can be anticipatory and turn much of today’s uncertainty into certainty.

Certainties fall into two categories: Hard Trends and Soft Trends. A Hard Trend is a projection based on measurable, tangible, and fully predictable facts. A Soft Trend is a trend that “might” happen. That means you can change or influence a Soft Trend. For example, saying that Baby Boomers will age is a Hard Trend—it will happen; it’s a future fact. But saying because over the past ten years fewer people have been becoming doctors means there won’t be enough doctors to treat aging Baby Boomers is a Soft Trend—it’s something we can choose to address or ignore; it’s a future maybe. Being the able to tell the difference between the two will enable your organization to transform its culture into one that profits from change, uncertainty, and burgeoning trends.

Change the View

To get employees at all levels to embrace change, you have to give them the confidence that certainty brings by having them get involved in identifying the Hard Trends that will happen. Therefore, encourage them to…

Make a list of all the Hard Trends that are taking place in your industry, so you know what you can be certain about.
Make a list of all the Soft Trends taking place in your industry, so you can see what you can change or influence.
Answer: What do I know will happen in the next few weeks, months, and years? And how can I innovate to take advantage of what I now know for certain about the future?

Additionally, let your employees know one more certainty: that their roles will change over the next five years. Tell them, “The people you report to can define what your new role is, but it would be better if you dictated your new role based on Hard Trends. You can either allow yourself to become less relevant or even obsolete, or you can see where your career is going and get the training and tools you need to become increasingly relevant and thrive.” In addition, have them go to certainties.Com for a list of the 12 career certainties that will shape every profession going forward.

Finally, realize that how you view the future shapes how you act today. And how you act today shapes your future. Therefore, your futureview becomes the future you. What is the futureview of your employees, business partners, and customers? When you manage the futureview and elevate it based on the Hard Trends and the certainties that are before you, your employees will actually embrace the changes before them. Remember, the good old days are not behind us. They’re ahead of us. Let’s make them happen together.

Daniel Burrus | linkedin.Com/today/post/article/20140116172936-48342529-change-your-employees-view-of-change?trk=object-title
Best Selling Author, Innovation Expert & Global Futurist, Entrepreneur, Strategic Advisor & Keynote Speaker